info@thetrust.org.uk · ☎ (020) 7924 9899

The Community Trust Working for the relief of poverty,
furtherance of education &
pursuit of racial harmony

Show Side Panel

Painted Brixton School

Oct 28 2015   |   By: admin   |   0   |   Posted in Uncategorized

There is an area on the Stockwell park estate which is known to the indigenous of the population as either: "The Pen", "The Coffin" or "The football pitch". Covered with ancient astro turf and with two distinct spaces, "The Pen" is a popular place for young people to spend time. Usually they can be found hanging over the railings watching the graffiti artists hard a work... sweating hour after hour... hungry and thirsty... worn out by their endeavours - that are allowed to remain untouched for at least twenty four hours... before the next artist sweeps away the image in a burst from a spray can. Sometimes they kick a ball around, blasting it into the concrete walls so that the bounce back hurts anyone daft enough to stand in its path! This time the kids themselves got to have a go at the artistic side. Whilst many refused to accept that they had an artistic bone in their body and said “I can’t”... they found it easy to work alongside Charlotte and Boyd and were enthused at the idea of writing on the walls, getting messy, working with seriously cool adults and leaving their mark. Thanks to Big Local, small grants were made available to sprinkle entertainment and employment support to the North Brixton Area over the summer period. So there they all were... in the Pen, just a little bit “painty” and very, very hungry! The Community Trust prepared a hearty supper for all those involved... every Friday! The Painted Brixton Project attended the Community Trust Housing Funday in Slade Gardens and painted “live “ pictures for their parents to admire... they then moved on to Brixton Bloc where some amazing fishes were intricately designed... they will soon be hanging on the walls of our newly refurbished Centre (soon, soon... we are assured it WILL be happening). An intergenerational, multi faith, multi racial group having fun, eating and laughing together, being productive and positive... who could want for a better way to spend a Friday evening?
Check out the video of the second "Painted Brixton" school session at Stockwell Hall of Fame.
Year 4 children create their word of the week. Thanks to Stockwell Community Centre. Funded by Big Local North Brixton and The London Community Foundation.    
Check out the video of the "Painted Brixton" school, sessions 3 and 4: twice the work in half the time at Stockwell Hall of Fame!
Year 4 children complete their graffiti experience at Stockwell Hall of Fame. We hear from their teachers, and see their work. Thanks to Stockwell Community Centre. Funded by Big Local North Brixton and The London Community Foundation.  

The Hottest Place to be this weekend: Sunday 2nd August 2015 was Brixton Splash….

Aug 02 2015   |   By: admin   |   0   |   Posted in Community, Music, Party, Uncategorized

http://www.brixtonbuzz.com/2015/08/brixton-splash-2015-street-snaps-and-unofficial-after-party-scenes/ (click this link for the original article on "Brixton Buzz") the Hottest Place to be this weekend – Sunday 2nd August 2015 was Brixton Splash.... Brixton Splash 2015 a small local affair that has grow’d and grow’d (just like Topsy) it was magnificent in its size but also in the massive amount of respect that hovered above the crowd – often mistaken as weed smoke. Trying to run up the road to Tesco became an assault course and having reached the interior, the alcohol aisle was packed with young people buying up the shop whilst appearing to be half cut already. The weather was good, the vibe was great and yet again Brixton smashed it... and not the windows of Foxton’s! brixton-splash-after-parties-02

Now and then… a story crossing generations – by Alvin Howell

Aug 01 2015   |   By: admin   |   0   |   Posted in Uncategorized

London is the host to many communities and Brixton in particular has a link with the Ras Tafarian movement. The Community Trust has many links with this community but our closest one is with Alvin Howell – our volunteer cook for probation and the Friday Night Supper. Alvin Howell is also a writer... and a thinker. His poetry hangs on the wall of the Centre, his words hang on the lips of our clients.

NOW: Alvin Howell

Knowing that my ancestor was a great speaker and helped motivate a lot of people inspired me to start writing poetry which has helped me a lot as I am not one to speak out all the time - but my poetry helps me do that and I hope it helps to inspire other people too (which it has previously)... I've even had people ask me to write a piece, so that they can put on their relative's grave stone. I will continue to write my poetry so I can inspire more people, here are some of my poetry titles: DARK CLOUD, I CAN BE ME, POEM FOR MY MOTHER AND I SPEAK. I will also be writing my poetry book which hopefully will be ready by the end of the year, it will be titled: MY THOUGHTS... (by Alvin Howell) - so keep a look out for it! Alvin aka "Beefy"  

THEN: Leonard Percival Howell

Leonard Percival Howell Leonard Percival Howell is part of my ancestry, which I only discovered about 10 years ago when my sister had a book and told me that he is part of our family tree on my dads side. He was one of the first to start the Rasta Movement which took him around the world, Leonard Percival Howell was born in the Parish of Clarendon, Jamaica. W.I. On June 16th, 1898. He died in Kingston, Jamaica. W.I. In 1981. He was born a hero, a scholar and beyond the shadow of a doubt died a hero defending his race. His parents Thomas and Clementina Howell, who were independent farmers and business owners, motivated their son Leonard to travel. In the 1920’s he left Jamaica on a ship to the United States of America, where he advanced his intellect and academic skills. Howell became the most successful teacher of Rastafari doctrine. He enjoined black people to be PROUD of heritage and culture, to have their own “Money” Banks, be self-motivated, strong, self-sufficient, where black economies would triumph and to hold high the value of education. Furthermore, he preached to show respect, love and honor. He said, “The white mans doctrine has forced the black man to forsake silver and gold and seek heaven after death. It has brought us to live in disgrace and die in dishonor”. Despite the fact that Howell became the most persecuted man in the history of Jamaica, he must be credited for purchasing over 500 acres of Land at Sligoville, in St. Catherine became known as PINNACLE. It was the center of the Rastafarian Movement, the first free slave, self sufficient and economically empowered African village in Jamaica (an historical move) Many generation of African slaves , in the thousand , came from rural and urban Jamaica settled on the land and made their vision a reality. They lived a natural way of life, in harmony with the universe, showed love and peace to all race and color, lived in unity, worked collectively, upheld culture, heritage, freedom and justice. Many who were farmers planted organic food, others who were skilled in arts and craft made household items. In addition: herbal medicine, roots, tonics and other produces were supplied and sold to the local government, private and public sectors. Howell was a man of great vision, and mystic spirituality. He created codes and principles based on the teaching of His Imperial Majesty, Haile Selassie I and developed the Nyahbinghi Order (a mystical religious order) that defined “death” by the Divine Creator to the blacks and white oppressors. Years later Howell formed “The Ethiopian Salvation Society” Before his death in 1981 Howell once said: " I am convinced that the children we are teaching today, will become vanguards and guardians to our freedom tomorrow and better citizens to defend our democracy and to ensure that generations to come will learn from the Holocaust of slavery, and keep the flame of remembrance burning. Help them to understand more about the past, that our history NEVER repeats itself so that we can create a better future for all human race.” The Community Trust likes to remember the words of others and to acknowledge the part they played in creating the building bricks of our diverse and harmonious community. When members of our community held an Emancipation Day Family Rally walking from Windrush Square to Kennington Park on Saturday 1st August 2015 the Trust were there to help them out with their banner making and seating arrangements. Everyone needs to reflect on the words of His Imperial Majesty, Emperor Haile Selassie I: "Throughout history it has been the inaction of those who could have acted, the indifference of those who should have known better, the silence of the voice of justice when it mattered most, that has made it possible for evil to triumph.” As relevant today as to all our yesterdays....

Everyone has a bad hair day now and then!

Jul 15 2015   |   By: admin   |   0   |   Posted in Community, Community Centre

When you come in to the office at the Community Trust we like to try and sort you out!!! Our three delightful models decided to go for completely different looks.

Brody Brigit

Brody Brigit went for the red high top.

 

Saucy Salome

Saucy Salome our wonderful and patient artist, teacher and curator of the SLAM studios on Brixton Road dipped in and came out with a winning wig!

 

60's Linda

Linda yearns for the sixties with her blonde bombshell look.... not a hairbrush for miles around!

  Fancy a change in your life? The Community Trust just might be able to make that happen!

Outsiders in London – Are you one, too?

Feb 22 2015   |   By: admin   |   0   |   Posted in Art, Community, Homepage Article, Information, Uncategorized

Press Release: 22nd February 2015 By Milan Svanderlik www.outsidersinlondon.org A free, seven-week exhibition, featuring the powerful portraits and deeply moving life stories of 41 extraordinary Londoners. This is Milan Svanderlik’s second major non-commercial exhibition at St Martin’s, in the very heart of London. Mon 23 March 2015 - Sat 9th May 2015 The Gallery in the Crypt, St Martin-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 4JJ (scroll to the bottom of the page for a location map)

Gary Barnes and Dennis Rose

UPDATE: Check out the following link where Dennis (no longer such a menace!) is the main feature in a 5 minute London Live culture programme, LondonGo. Dennis on the London Live programme Dennis Rose and Gary Areef Barnes are two of the 40 people who took part in the project: they have both felt like outsiders and in many ways they continue to do so. Yet they are insiders too and very much a part of the Stockwell Park Estate community in Brixton. Both their life stories are captivating, moving and inspirational because they offer hope to a younger generation; indeed, they are an inspiration to all of us. The term ‘outsiders’ often has negative connotations: these are the people who are regarded as ‘them’ incontrast to ‘us’, the arrivals from distant provinces or foreign lands, those not quite belonging, those not exactly fitting in, those not conforming. Of course, there is another side to this coin: there are those who stand out deliberately, who choose to go against the grain, the ones who challenge established social, cultural or religious norms, who question the policies and orthodoxies broadly accepted by those who are of the mainstream, those ‘on the inside’. Outsiders in London aims to illustrate how many of us will experience the feeling of being an outsider at some stage in our lives; how some of us are labelled as, or feel ourselves to be, outsiders from the very outset but manage to turn this into an advantage, or just make the best of it; how some of us are crushed by the burden of being ‘on the outside’, while others grapple with it, grow stronger and, in overcoming adversity, quite often make exceptional contributions to society. This Exhibition reveals something of the lives of 41 such individuals, who perceive (or have perceived) themselves as ‘outsiders’ in one way or another, and to celebrate both that they have survived and what they have achieved. It is also to be hoped that every one of us will recognise in these images, and life stories, some facet of ourselves or of someone close to us. Milan’s latest exhibition has a strong link to its predecessor, 100 Faces of London, held at The Gallery in the Crypt in 2012, as it too emphasises the extraordinary diversity of London’s population, but this time with a more explicit socio-political slant. All the portraits and the associated life stories (in full) of the 40+ individuals are already online and can be viewed at: www.outsidersinlondon.org
The Gallery in the Crypt St Martin-in-the-Fields Trafalgar Square London WC2N 4JJ

View map

Help with Job Search and much more

Feb 11 2015   |   By: fridge908   |   0   |   Posted in Community, Community Centre, Uncategorized

compWe are delighted to be able to offer help to people in the community. The Trust is working seamlessly with Peter Ford in the Training Room on Mondays and Wednesdays, the Trust can help you with your CV, signing on to Universal Job Match and assisting you with Job Search. We can also give your computer skills a lift. Come along and meet Peter from 2pm onwards.

New chairs for the centre

Feb 10 2015   |   By: fridge908   |   0   |   Posted in Community Centre

FullSizeRenderIt was a cold, dark January day and Daddy Fridge was fed up with carrying broken and busted chairs around the building...it was a light bulb moment and he leapt on his phone and typed in

Wanted  - chairs for our community...like the Trust...cheap and cheerful!”

 

Amazingly...it was the Commonwealth Games that bailed us out!

A quick trip, in a cold van, to Romford for Jamie and Faisal ...followed by the heart stopping moment where the(hired)  van  got stuck in the underground car park of some well known (but not  necessarily best  loved) eatery in East London. Some jostling and sweating...scraping and swearing ( a bit like child birth if I  re member rightly!) and out slipped the van and Faisal’s heart rate returned to that of a normal human being not expecting to A few hours in a chilly container heaving two hundred, gleaming white chairs out across the freezing landscape and into the van.

A bit of banter...back to Brixton...drop off chairs and out again like heat seeking missiles to collect a beautiful set of banqueting chairs...so much discount! And back to Brixton again. 

Two trips to the dump to get rid of rubbish and the day is done!

9:00am start....11:00pm finish...thanks to all those who helped when the chairs arrived...there were lots of hands on deck...Great communities deserve great chairs for our great behinds...and there’s not many in the area who can say that!

 

So those of you who want to hire our hall...be prepared to be dazzled by the ex Common Wealth Games chairs...come party with us!

Twenty Years Have Flown By – The Full Article!

Jun 10 2014   |   By: admin   |   0   |   Posted in Uncategorized

When the Community Trust first started on its journey to support the most marginalised in the area, it knocked on 1500 front doors and asked those who lived there what their aspirations for the future were and what were the key things that worried them. The results were overwhelming. The fear and reality of poverty, the lack of education and opportunities for their children and the uncertainty about their futures led local people to set up a charity and a company limited by guarantee, dedicated to the relief of poverty, furtherance of education and the pursuit of racial harmony. Armed with the knowledge about people fears for the future the Community Trust exercised the Right to Manage and took over the management of 1500 social housing homes on the Stockwell/Brixton borders. Reopening the closed Community Centre and the necessity to lever in millions of pounds for the improvement of local homes, drove the Trust to orchestrate the birth of Community Trust Housing, a housing association led by local people to oversee the regeneration of the area and the building of new homes. The Community Trust settled down to work from the Community Centre to deliver services to local people with the aims of the charity firmly set in their sights...
[continued from the front page...] The Trust’s doors are open from 10:00am – 10:00pm seven days a week. The individuals may change but their needs remain the same. Uncertainty, loneliness, fear and a time in their lives when they need support brings people through those doors. The Trust has always looked for solutions to our local problems from amongst our own community and for years we engaged with those most at risk in the area: the young people who were responsible for high crime levels, drug dealing and anti-social behaviour. These were some of the most difficult years as the Trust had to gain the trust of the local youngsters and also deal honestly and openly with the problems they brought to the area. Trustees worked hard to bridge the generation divide and by working together they managed to deliver the first free internet café of its kind anywhere in the UK to our knowledge - making sure that local youngsters had a head start in the new digital world. The Community Centre itself aged as its clients grew up into productive and responsible young adults and currently, on a wet day, the umbrellas need to be put up as the roof leaks! Community Trust Housing has promised a £1 million investment into the bricks and mortar and we are currently at the design stage hoping that we will see the first workers on-site this year… mending equipment at the ready! Our years of being based in the community has led us to develop links with our local authority (Lambeth), the Metropolitan Police and many other statutory and voluntary organisations in the area. We have been fortunate enough to be funded through the "Dispossessed Fund" (Evening Standard), Comic Relief, the Job Centre, the Walcot Foundation, the Big Lottery and most of all, our major funder: Community Trust Housing.
There once was a time of plenty and the Trust was able to do all the “nice” things that help make the world go round… trips out for the children and adults, 'Fun Days' and adventurous weekends away. Funding problems compounded by rising costs and a changing external environment has meant that the Trust has had to “hunker down” in order to continue to deliver the core services our increasingly fragile community needs. Poverty, loneliness and problems “fitting in” do not rate highly on the agenda of those who are not being affected by the changes to the benefits system, the rising social rents, the educational divide and the breakdown of family life. There are no quick solutions and for some it is about completely turning their lives around and looking in new directions for their future. The commitment that the Trust has to an extended and refurbished community centre keeps us positive as we face some of the toughest times for years. Our trustees are largely from the local area and some are facing the same problems as our clients. This understanding has led them to plan for the future knowing that it might be very different from the “today”. Recognising the need to have partners who bring different skills to the table, the Trust was fortunate enough to be accepted by Pilot Light who have helped us to focus on our core offer whilst leaving room for flexibility in the future. We are very grateful for the patience they displayed, whilst we struggled to find the words to describe why we did what we did… and why we do what we do!
    helmi---no-bg
 

BMX Saved My Life: Shane Francis

Jun 10 2014   |   By: admin   |   0   |   Posted in Community, Uncategorized

shane-bike-jump
Access Sport Beneficiary Shane in the Evening Standard! Urging others to step back from the vicious cycle of crime and a constant struggle to remain in education; Shane Francis, an 18 year old from Stockwell, found a passion for BMX through Peckham BMX Club, one of the BMX Legacy Project’s partner clubs, which has significantly helped to calm his frustrations and redirect his energy to his potential Olympic success… “BMX saved my life…”  Shane was kicked out of school at 14 years of age for bad behaviour which led to poor decisions resulting in Shane getting in trouble with the police. “School just didn’t agree with me. I could not cope and got into arguments. I was misguided and on and off police bail.”
Now Southern Region Champion for the 17-29 age group in 2013, Shane describes “BMX calmed me down. It has changed my personality. The sport is part of me now. The discipline has really helped. I try to be a role model for boys who are younger than me.” Shane’s hard work and determination to turn his life around and achieve success in BMX is evident as he now endeavours to achieve a podium finish in the upcoming British Championships! In the meantime, alongside CK Flash, Peckham BMX Club leader, Shane will take part in the London Cycle Sportive on the 11th of May 2014. The ride, finishing at Herne Hill Velodrome, will support Access Sport and help us continue to transform more lives through sport!
shane5
shane4
shane2
shane3